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Lobster supply and a ‘moderate livelihood’

As tensions between Nova Scotia’s Indigenous lobster fishermen and non-Indigenous inshore fishermen remain high, so does the pressure on Ottawa to name a facilitator. Earlier this week, Nova Scotia Premier Stephen MacNeil tweeted that he had spoken with the prime minster, who suggested a three-person panel be struck, with one member chosen by First Nations, […]

A Sipekne’katik lobster boat heads out to fish from the wharf in Saulnierville, N.S., on Oct. 19, 2020. (Steve McKinley/Toronto Star)

As tensions between Nova Scotia’s Indigenous lobster fishermen and non-Indigenous inshore fishermen remain high, so does the pressure on Ottawa to name a facilitator.

Earlier this week, Nova Scotia Premier Stephen MacNeil tweeted that he had spoken with the prime minster, who suggested a three-person panel be struck, with one member chosen by First Nations, one by the commercial fishermen, and the third agreed to by all, including the Department of Fisheries and Oceans.

On Monday, Fisheries and Oceans Minister Bernadette Jordan told reporters the government was holding nation-to-nation negotiations, and was “working on a path forward to make sure that the affirmed right … by the Supreme Court is implemented.”

In a 1999 decision in favour of Indigenous man Donald Marshall, who was accused of fishing illegally, the…

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