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‘Extinct’ animal makes a comeback in not one, but two countries

Researchers have spotted specimens of an incredibly rare species of elephant shrew for the first time in over half a century. The creatures were on the “lost species” list and nobody knew if they were extinct or not. The tiny shrews will now be studied in more detail for the first time ever. When scientists can’t find a species for a few years, it’s worrisome. When they can’t locate it for a decade, it’s even more troubling. But when a species disappears for over 50 years, well, it’s virtually impossible to hold out hope of ever seeing it again. That is unless that species is the Somali sengi, a tiny member of the elephant shrew family that has just be

Researchers have spotted specimens of an incredibly rare species of elephant shrew for the first time in over half a century.

The creatures were on the “lost species” list and nobody knew if they were extinct or not.

The tiny shrews will now be studied in more detail for the first time ever.

When scientists can’t find a species for a few years, it’s worrisome. When they can’t locate it for a decade, it’s even more troubling. But when a species disappears for over 50 years, well, it’s virtually impossible to hold out hope of ever seeing it again. That is unless that species is the Somali sengi, a tiny member of the elephant shrew family that has just be spotted after over half a century of being lost.

As NPR reports, the tiny shrew is (or was) a member of the lost species list. The animals on the list are either extinct or are so few in number that it’s incredibly hard to find even one of them. Miraculously, this little shrew species is indeed still kicking.

The shrew made a comeback in two areas, according to scientists. It was recently located not just in its native Somalia, but also in the nearby country of Djibouti. The last time one had been officially spotted was way back in 1968, so to have the shrew pop up in two new areas is one heck of a way to make a…

Mike Wehner

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