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Dad furious after family-of-nine who live together are turned away from pub over rule of six

A DAD was left fuming after he took his family-of-nine who live together out for a pub meal but was turned away over the rule of six. Daniel Gough, 39, wanted to take his girlfriend Helen and their…

A DAD was left fuming after he took his family-of-nine who live together out for a pub meal but was turned away over the rule of six.

Daniel Gough, 39, wanted to take his girlfriend Helen and their seven kids, aged between five months and 14, out to the Baldwin Arms, a Hungry Horse pub in Hall Green, Birmingham.

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5 Daniel Gough, pictured with his family last Christmas, was left fuming over the pub’s decision not to serve them Credit: BPM Media

5 Daniel had wanted to take his family out for a pub meal on October 4 Credit: Google

The scaffolder, who is a regular at the pub, says he told staff they were all from the same household when they visited on October 4.

But the pub manager said they wouldn’t be allowed in to eat because there was more than six of them.

Under the rule of six, the government makes allowances for large families who live under the same roof.

The pub said it had “taken the decision to limit table sizes to six in all circumstances”.

Mr Gough told Birmingham Live: “I am a scaffolder and I work away quite a bit. When I do come home I want to treat my girlfriend and kids so I take them out for meals.

“I have been a regular at the Baldwin Arms and visit about three times a week.

How the rule of six works for large families Boris Johnson announced the rule of six regulation on September 14, with groups of more than six people banned from meeting up. However, households and support bubbles of more than six people are exempt from the new rules. The guidelines state exemptions apply in the following circumstances: “Where everyone lives together or is in the same support bubble, or to continue existing arrangements where children do not live in the same household as both their parents.” A support bubble is a small circle of people who can socialise exclusively. The idea lets adults who live alone and single parents with children under 18 to join up with one other household so they can visit each other’s homes, stay the night and travel together in vehicles.

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